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Think Outside the Packaging

By Joe Walsh
November 13, 2014
Think Outside the Packaging

Image Credit: www.twistedsifter.com

A recent post from Twisted Sifter about unique business cards caught our eye and got us thinking. Among the novelties is a business card for a survival training provider in British Columbia. The card is a piece of beef jerky. Yum.

The ideas are fun, inspired, purposeful and clever. The applied imagination of the creators of these cards could be focused on just about any type of marketing communications. A proposal. A novel trade show booth. A clutter-busting direct mail piece. Even a tchotchke. The idea is to make a first impression a lasting impression.

What follows are some recent examples of clients that follow the principle of reconsidering the box to think outside it.

Food for thought.

Gesmer Updegrove. The 30-lawyer Boston law firm, known for serving the financing needs of emerging growth companies, found that its own clients were not aware of the firm's skills beyond financing and deal-making. Things like employment law, litigation, patent issues and taxes—all key challenges as companies grow. In response, Gesmer created a survival guide with some clever packaging and a branded Swiss Army knife that all comes in an imaginative box wrapped around a helpful field guide.

Gesmer

 

Erickson Immigration Group. This 12-lawyer immigration law firm made a big impression on their high tech clients and prospects at the Global Workforce Symposium. We created a giant ethernet cord in the form of a globe, painted it with their school colors, lime green and blue, and asked visitors at the conference to guess the length of the cord it took to make the ball. That idea generated so much interest at the show, we got a repeat engagement. Year two was green and blue lights—literally hundreds—that also required guessing about how many. Imagine that.

Erickson