ripe to pick

Another bumper crop year

And brand new fields to hoe with Finn Partners.
Our focus on creating and marketing fresh brands with clients remains at the core of what Greenfield Belser does. Inside this year’s annual review, you’ll find our picks for brand makeovers, extensions and campaigns that drive growth.

See More

Brand Thinking
Bleeding edge thinking on branding and marketing

blog

Apple Pay: Believe the Hype

By Greenfield/Belser
November 10, 2014
Apple Pay: Believe the Hype

People are resistant to change. It's in our nature. So naturally, when something comes along like Apple Pay, there will be naysayers and avid supporters all the same. I've been an Apple customer my entire life and wouldn't ever dare to verge from the mainstream iPhone and MacBook path. That bias being admitted, I was pretty skeptical about Apple Pay. At some point you have to wonder, how many digital hackers and credit card breaches can companies withstand before they stop putting themselves at risk?

However, Apple Pay has been getting great feedback:

"The new payment system is convenient, problem-free and even fun."

–Molly Wood, The New York Times

"...Apple's vision of electronic payments is convenient, fast and reliable. Apple Pay is for real."

–Pete Pachal, Mashable

"There’s a ways to go before we’re all paying for things with our phones. But Apple Pay has laid a blueprint for it that makes more sense than any option before."

–Geoffrey A. Fowler, The Wall Street Journal

Even Bill Gates praised Apple Pay in a recent commentary on today's financial system.

Not to say there aren't drawbacks. As with any program of this caliber, there are security concerns, onset glitches and other hiccups along the adoption process. A point of contention arising is that retailers do not truly reap any benefit from Apple Pay, as they still are paying the same fees to the credit card companies. Most issues noted in reviews are that it's not available in enough places, but that's not an issue of the functionality. CVS, WalMart, RiteAid and Target pulled out quietly, raising concerns as well but this recent Business Insider article just exposed that mystery; general consensus being, that it was the wrong move.

Apple advertises it as a "breakthrough contactless payment technology" and many are lauding it as the payment method of our future. I'm starting to think they are right. Besides, I go to McDonald's too much to not make this work.